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Restoration Video

vibrac

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Its definitely my age I would rather read about a technical act that watch it on a video, how strange. at least we are spared for most of the time from some post 70's pop that accompany some videos. Personally I think its quite good artistically and as a piece of TV certainly better than the abysmal offerings from master Cole. But five sheets of close typing would tell me all I need much better. And if you think a book on restoration is dull try Triumph Twin Restoration by Roy Bacon thats information and entertainment.
NB I find some people think the terms Restoration and Rebuilding are the same thing rebuilding is just Meccano built big... examples abound.
 

Chris Launders

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I noticed that apart from a few rusty nuts it was in good condition, no stripped threads, rounded off nuts and chiselled screws, tank and tinware not rotted through, everything bent and twisted, it was virtually take it apart, clean and paint and put back together, looked like it had hardly had a spanner on it from new.
 

vibrac

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I noticed that apart from a few rusty nuts it was in good condition, no stripped threads, rounded off nuts and chiselled screws, tank and tinware not rotted through, everything bent and twisted, it was virtually take it apart, clean and paint and put back together, looked like it had hardly had a spanner on it from new.
Yep Rebuild
 

timetraveller

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I found it a pleasure to watch and the guy certainly knows more about chemistry than most of us. Nice to know that there are Ruskis just as mad as the rest of us.
 

Magnetoman

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
That's a beautifully made video that required a huge amount of work to film and edit. Kudos to the people who created it. However, only the seriously afflicted would watch such a video so the potential audience must be quite limited. Not to say I'm not one of the seriously afflicted, but I watched it for a different reason. For my own reasons, I was looking for any scene(s) where video was better than a few still images for explaining how to do a procedure or process when rebuilding a motorcycle.

The reason for my interest is I document my rebuilds fairly extensively with photographs, but would it be better on video? Even ignoring the considerable additional time it would take to frame each scene and light it properly, I didn't see anything in that video where a photograph accompanied by a written explanation wouldn't be better than a narrated video clip.

Written words alone would better than nothing for describing how to, say, balance a crankshaft. But, a few photographs along with the written words would be a lot better than just the words alone. But, it seems to me, video with spoken words would be a step backwards, at least as far as documenting a rebuild in a fashion most useful for someone else to be able to follow. However, there's no doubt that Russian video would be much better than any number of words or photographs for tricking unsuspecting souls into believing motorcycle restoration was a straightforward process, where every rusted fastener came loose with a few drops of oil and a light twist of the spanner, and hands never got dirty. For propaganda, video can't be beat.
 

Cyborg

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I found the boiled linseed oil interesting. It was many years ago I found out how well it works as a rust preventative. A fellow from South Africa (who was some sort of engineer working at sea on freighters) told me about it. His car was up on a hoist next to one of the same make/ model/year. The difference was amazing. When new, he had gone through the car applying linseed oil (combined with other things in small percentages) He even removed some fasteners that were prone to corrosion and applied his concoction. Apparently one of the advantages was that (for components like A frames) the linseed oil only hardens on the outer surface. If damaged, it will bleed slightly and tend to seal itself. It certainly seemed worth his effort.
I had never heard of heating the part and then submerging it. Wish I had know that.... would have made the boat maintenance a little less aggravating.
 

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