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Part 2

cyberweld

New Website User
VOC Member
This is part one of the oil change


I cannot find part 2 . Can anyone give me a pointer . Want to see how to prime the oil when changing the oil

Thanks
 

SteveW

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Besides the obvious, I put mine on it's left side stand and fill the filter chamber to as high as I can before replaceing the A22/1 bolt. There may be a slight delay in getting oil to the valve gear, hence the squirting oil down the push rod tubes. Mine usually is pumping back to the tank before I get the cap off after starting it. Good luck.
 

Sten Jensen

Website User
VOC Member
Well Part 91 of the series is about changing oil on gearbox and primary chain, so probably that is 'Part 2'.
Yes, as Stewe says fill the oil filter chamber and squirt oil down the pushrod tubes.
After you have put oil in the oiltank (do not overfill, you can top up later) loosen the banjo below the timing cover where you drained the oil untill oil seep out then tighten it. This to prime the feed pipe. Be carefull not to overtighten the banjobolts as they are rather fragile.
If the bike is newly assembled or has been standing for a long time I would also remove the bigend quill in the timing cover and push oil into the crankshaft. The video also showed the domed nut over the jet in top of the timing cover. I would also remove the nut and the jet and pour oil down there.
After starting, check that the oil is returning to oil tank by looking down the filler neck. You can shortly block the return stream with your finger to create a bit of extra pressure lubricating the rockers and and valve gear.
 

davidd

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
The most difficult place to prime is the scavenge chamber behind the flywheel. This reservoir supplies the oil to the top end and the return pipe in the filler neck. If the scavenge chamber is empty and there is little oil in the sump, it may take minutes instead of seconds to get oil flowing through the return pipe in the filler neck.

If you have splashed enough oil around the slowness of the return oil is not a problem. If it drives you crazy, fill the sump with oil and kick the bike over with no plugs for a number of kicks. The oil on the flywheels will fill the scavenge chamber. Drain the sump into a clean pan and put the oil in the oil tank. The scavenge side of the oil pump will now provide oil to the rockers and the return pipe from the first firing.

David
 

Cyborg

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Another option....You could buy or build an oil priming tank. Not necessary for oil changes, but handy for after having the engine apart. It can also be attache’d to the return line to prime the line and run oil into the rockers and eventually down the pushrod tubes.

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vibrac

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Are we over thinking this and other tasks?. Just get an Oil can take off the rocker covers squirt in some oil, stuff some up the timing cover brass plug hole to the big end, put some in the oil filter and slap her on the rollers* till it spurts back then put the plugs in. (*That bit is in deference to my age and right leg)
As in so many things from how tight the nuts are to cleaning the points we need to keep a sense of proportion in mind and the date 1950 and what they did back then when they built the bikes and kept them running to get to work every day and hauling the double adult down to Brighton. The back yard of a semi or the kerb side in the suburbs was not a science laboratory. The survival rate should tell you they were(and are) tough old bikes
 

brian gains

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Mike: you did one of your expert transition editing shots when draining the sump. out of interest, was that about a mug full of oil?.
 

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