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NSU Fox Clutch Adjuster

Josh Smith

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As some of you may know, I own a four-stroke Vincent Fox, which I've been busy working on, trying to get it ready for the North Kent Section's first meet of the year. Having passed my A1 motorcycle test at the end of last year, it'll be the first Vincent event I'll be able to attend on an actual Vincent, as opposed to arriving on the back of my Dad's bike, or on my Yamaha.

The clutch has been an absolute nightmare, but I think we're there now, plus we've had a special heavy-duty cable made.

However, the slotted adjuster I have is very slightly too short as shown below:

IMG_3827.jpg

Unfortunately, the only longer one I could get hold of is off a Triumph, and it doesn't have the slot…

63940523575__6FB41EC2-D8B9-4205-9828-F190755F7E49.jpg

Is there anyone out there in UK-Vincent land who is able to mill a small slot through my new adjuster?

Josh
 

b'knighted

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VOC Member
Hi Josh,
can you, as an alternative, use an abutment similar to those used on the twistgrip to effectively increase the outer cable length? This could be done at either end of the clutch cable.
 

Colin

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VOC Member
Hi Josh
Well done for getting this far with the Fox. Do try fixing it yourself, for one thing it will give you satisfaction for having done it, secondly it is good practice for all the tweaks, fixes etc you will inevitably have to do (often on the side of the road) to keep an old bike going.
Put two hacksaw blades side by side (you may need a tweak to get two in a frame) put the adjuster, carefully in a padded vice, not too tight and carefully saw along the length. Believe me you can do it, but if anything does go wrong you can get another Triumph adjuster.
Go for it mate.
 

Josh Smith

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PS Hope to see you and the Smith clan, you on the Fox, at the (adjusted) April Fools Meet on "D" Day
How appropriate, the biggest rescue mission, of all time
Thanks Colin, should be there all being well.

I’ll head into the workshop in a bit and give it a go. I need to have a look at the carb too as when I tried to take the bike out last night I didn’t get very far! It seemed like a fuel starvation problem.

Josh
 

b'knighted

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Just to muddy the waters, I would have expected the NSU to use metric threads and the Triumph to use imperial, changing from Whit to AF spanner sizes and therefore probably from Whit to UNF/UNC thread form in the sixties.
 

vibrac

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Back in mid 50's there was a set percentage set by .gov of British supplied items on imported bikes to enable certain discounts on tax (Not unlike the percentage of Japanese content on UK products to the EU now)
I have read it (Probably on here !) but could have been up to 50%
 

Josh Smith

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Yeah, question is whether the handlebar levers were British or from NSU. As far as I know some components of the NSU were from local brands.

Vic
Back in mid 50's there was a set percentage set by .gov of British supplied items on imported bikes to enable certain discounts on tax (Not unlike the percentage of Japanese content on UK products to the EU now)
I have read it (Probably on here !) but could have been up to 50%
Tim’s right. To qualify for some tax relief 51% of the overall components on the bike had to be British-made (levers, fenders, wheels [Dunlop], carburettor [Amal] etc). The only German parts were the front forks and engine.

Josh
 

Pete Appleton

VOC Hon. Social Secretary
VOC Member
VOC Forum Administrator
If you still need the bolt milled Josh bung it in the post and I will have a go.
If you have already done it yourself and you plan on having a long part of it sticking out it could be worth leaving a nut up under the head to prevent twisting and opening of the slot.
 

Josh Smith

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Hi Pete,

I’ve put it in the post so should arrive soon hopefully. There are two nuts on the cable already so the plan is to sandwich the bolt. The thread inside the crankcase is definitely not the best towards the top (and the old adjuster kept slipping out of it), so hopefully sandwiching the adjuster bolt between the nuts will combat any future wear to the thread.

Josh
 

Bill Thomas

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Josh, Too late to help you now,
But if you are going to do Bike work, Wilco do a cheap angle grinder 4 1/4",
About £25, Or maybe a better one if you can afford it, From somewhere else,
Be careful they can be dangerous if not used right !!.
It came into my head when not thinking of your problem ! , Happens a lot as you get older !!,
You can buy very thin cutting discs, That cut through metal very well, handy for lots of jobs,
It would do your cable job in seconds !.
Also Flap discs for removing metal and wood.
Cheers Bill.
 
Last edited:

ossie

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Josh, Too late to help you now,
But if you are going to do Bike work, Wilco do a cheap angle grinder 4 1/4",
About £25, Or maybe a better one if you can afford it, From somewhere else,
Be careful they can be dangerous if not used right !!.
It came into my head when not thinking of your problem ! , Happens a lot as you get older !!,
You can buy very thin cutting discs, That cut through metal very well, handy for lots of jobs,
It would do your cable job in seconds !.
Also Flap discs for removing metal and wood.
Cheers Bill.
Aldi are doing thin angle cutter blades for metal just bought some 11 in packet. OSSIE
 

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