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Ex Terry Prince ?.

Peter Holmes

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Nice bike, nice video, with a fair bit of misinformation thrown in, around 6000 made? unless that was the twin output, designed in the thirties? Mikuni carbs? unless they were changed for Amal Concentrics at a later date, but the engine does sound to be in fine fettle.
I don't agree that Vincent ceased production because they sat back and rested on their laurels, far from it, they were well ahead of the game until the very end, you can't even blame their demise on the Mini, that came a bit later, I think it was simply cost, now were the Vincent still being manufactured today they would probably just take a leaf out of Triumphs book and retain all the prestige of the brand whilst producing them cheaply in Thailand or somewhere similar.
 

ClassicBiker

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I think he mentioned Mikunis as one of the reasons the reasons it didn't sell in the Mecum auction, not that it currently had them.
I agree with you, Peter. I don't agree that Vincent ceased production because of resting on their laurels. I believe there were a number of factors involved. From what I've read, it was cost of production versus what the market was willing/able to pay. A lack of investment in the manufacturing process to reduce production cost. I remember reading that PCV had ordered up to date tooling to reduce production cost and in the long run increase profit, just before he had his serious bike accident that sent him to his father's ranch in Argentina to recuperate. In his absence the board of directors or the receiver decided it was an unnecessary expense and cancelled the order. This was during the post war austerity period in Britain when such things were only made available to those who had a viable plan to export. Raw materials for production were also doled out to those who could prove they were capable of manufacturing exportable products that would bring revenue into the country. By canceling the order for the tools the board of directors or receiver essentially admitted to the government that they didn't have a suitable product. Thus reducing their ability to secure material to manufacture their product. All done so the board could get a larger dividend check. Talk about "spoiling the ship for a ha'porth of tar"! Another contributing factor I recall reading is PCV's uncompromising insistence building what he thought the public should have versus what it actually wanted. While without a doubt technically advanced, dual brakes on both wheels, cantilever rear suspension, unit construction, front suspension adjustable for solo or sidecar use, engine as a stressed member of the chassis, the Series A, B, C, were light years ahead of any competition. The Series D took it to the next level I think when the seat was full suspended and isolated from the rear wheel. But I think he went a step to far with the full enclosure. As clean and smooth as it made the bike look, the buying public wasn't ready for it. Triumph found out the same thing when it enclosed the rear of the 350 and 500 models in the "bathtub", paring that down to the "bikini" then finally dropping it all together. The buying public equated partial or full enclosures with scooters not motorcycles. Even the mighty Honda occasionally misreads the public. The Pacific Coast 800 which was in production for 9 years only sold 14,000 worldwide, a mere pittance in Honda terms.
No the demise of Vincent was far more complicated than merely resting on their laurels.
Steven
 

Bill Thomas

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I didn't like the enclosed Bikes, Back in the day,
Big Scooters !!, But now changed my mind, But too late and way too much money,
I nearly bought one of those Honda's, My local dealer had one cheap a year or so ago.
Looked like the Vin', To me,
but the wife said NO,
 

vibrac

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I think that the reliance on ministry contracts like Picador and the lifeboat that took up valuable recources for little result and NSU doing the dirty in year 2 of high demand had a influence that must have more than equaled a reticent board and PEI's overestimate of the public taste.
 

ClassicBiker

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I think that the reliance on ministry contracts like Picador and the lifeboat that took up valuable recources for little result and NSU doing the dirty in year 2 of high demand had a influence that must have more than equaled a reticent board and PEI's overestimate of the public taste.

Undoubtedly it contributed. To what it contributed we can only speculate. But what I don't believe contributed was Vincent resting on its laurels.
Steven
 

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