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Cross Winds

nigsey

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VOC Member
It was quite windy on my ride out today on my standard C Rap and I had quite a few very dodgy moments due to cross winds. It gave a sensation like the rear end was sliding from under me, not a pleasant feeling and certainly not something I’ve noticed anywhere near as much on a modern bike with a fairing. Is this a common experience with Vincents?
 

Bill Thomas

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Can't say I have had that, But you get more wind up there ?,
But I won't use high tyre pressures, Even when racing, I find it makes the Bike too nervous,
I only use 26 lb front 30 rear, Just myself on the Bike.

What tyres do you use, Vincents like a ribbed front , If you can get one.
 

bmetcalf

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VOC Member
Was it Vic Willoughby who rode an early Prince to Glasgow and back and reported no effect from crosswinds?
 

nigsey

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Can't say I have had that, But you get more wind up there ?,
But I won't use high tyre pressures, Even when racing, I find it makes the Bike too nervous,
I only use 26 lb front 30 rear, Just myself on the Bike.

What tyres do you use, Vincents like a ribbed front , If you can get one.
Hi Bill. Avon Speedmaster Mk2 3.00s20 front and Avon SM Mk2 3.5-19 on the rear. Pressures are 26Ib in front and 20Ib rear.
 

vibrac

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VOC Member
I noticed when I had a solo seat on the Comet it was more affected by side winds... go figure
 

nigsey

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VOC Member
The rear tyre is far too soft. It will squirm in good conditions let alone windy ones.

You also risk ripping the valve out of the inner tube if the tyre creeps.
Thanks for that NS, I’ve gone with what the rider‘s handbook recommend, what pressure would you recommed? Squim is a very apt description.
 

Nulli Secundus

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VOC Member
VOC Forum Moderator
It depends on your weight. The heavier you are the higher the pressure you will require. Try 26psi for starters and perhaps increase if needs be.

The modern SM Avons have a much more flexible sidewall compared to those available when the Vincent handbook was written, so you cannot go by the book anymore.

I use RoadRiders so I cannot advise a good SM pressure for you and your bike. Try sitting on the bike and ask a knowledgeable friend to judge whether the tyre has squashed when you climb aboard. This with the bike off the stand. Alternatively if they are a similar weight to you, get them to climb on the bike and you make the judgement call.

The tyre pressure will go up when the tyre flexes and warms up, but you don't want the flexing to be going on for too long. It can crack the tyre wall and chafe the inner tube on the ribs on the inner carcase of the tyre.
 

nigsey

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
It depends on your weight. The heavier you are the higher the pressure you will require. Try 26psi for starters and perhaps increase if needs be.

The modern SM Avons have a much more flexible sidewall compared to those available when the Vincent handbook was written, so you cannot go by the book anymore.

I use RoadRiders so I cannot advise a good SM pressure for you and your bike. Try sitting on the bike and ask a knowledgeable friend to judge whether the tyre has squashed when you climb aboard. This with the bike off the stand. Alternatively if they are a similar weight to you, get them to climb on the bike and you make the judgement call.

The tyre pressure will go up when the tyre flexes and warms up, but you don't want the flexing to be going on for too long. It can crack the tyre wall and chafe the inner tube on the ribs on the inner carcase of the tyre.
Ok, thanks, I’ll try that. I’m a lightweight at a mere 10.5 stone.
 

Bill Thomas

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Yes I agree, The back is a bit too low, Maybe 26 ?, On the rear,
I just wheeled a 300-20 Front, In the shop, I don't think I would go over 20 front ?.
Cheers Bill.
 

greg brillus

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VOC Member
Other points that could cause that feeling, check the wheel alignment, and the rear chain tension........either of these will make a difference, and also if the rear swingarm is loose for whatever reason, this too will make the rear end give a strange feeling when riding........Then there's steering head bearings, and so on.........So quite a few things could add to this feeling when riding.
 

Martyn Goodwin

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VOC Member
I am using michelin tyres on my comet and run 34 rear and 30 front. If/when the tyre pressures drop by more than 4 psi at either end I can really feel the handling going off.

If its the front that has lost pressure the bike really 'pushes' or understeers in corners.
If its the rear thats lost pressure then the back end feels like it moving about - sort of squishy - in corners

Oh - I weigh in at 12 stone
 
Last edited:

Bobv07662

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
When I first started to ride my C Rapide I used that same low pressure rear tire reccomendation in the riders handbook. It rode terribly! Excessive rear slip angles and " chine walking" at speed. Raised the rear pressure up to 28 and all has been well for almost a year.
Perhaps that old English air was heavier? :)
 

Robert Watson

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No the old English tyres were heavier! Much stiffer side walls and much harder rubber. New soft compounds and fabrics require more pressure. When riding two up with luggage on my B with 300-20 speedmaster and 350 - 19 roadrunner I ran 30 - 32 in the front and about 32 - 34 in the rear.
 

Nulli Secundus

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
VOC Forum Moderator
We seem to be repeating facts here. Perhaps @nigsey could report back if increasing the pressure in his tyres has helped, or whether he has found that the problem(s) was due to any of the things Greg suggested?
 

nigsey

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
We seem to be repeating facts here. Perhaps @nigsey could report back if increasing the pressure in his tyres has helped, or whether he has found that the problem(s) was due to any of the things Greg suggested?
All of the replies have been very helpful thank you gentlemen, I would never have guessed the problem could be something to do with insufficient tyre pressure. I will certainly put more air in as suggested and will report back but not before the weather has improved, it’s blowing a hoolie here and too windy to ride, higher tyre pressures or not.
 

Albervin

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
On a Vincent with standard suspension there is no great need to raise the tyre pressures as you do with modern bikes. This is because the weight of the passenger and/or luggage is not directly transferred to the rear suspension or rear wheel. A fully sprung Vincent (Series D) is a different matter. Start with 30 front and 32 rear and adjust from there. A good test is to inflate tyres, go for a decent ride and immediately check pressures when parked. If the pressures have increased by more than 10% then the original pressures are wrong.
 

Bill Thomas

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VOC Member
The wind, that's what I said at first !,
I look at a website on Bird watching, And they said how bad it was up there on that day.
 

Vincent Brake

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VOC Member
On a Vincent with standard suspension there is no great need to raise the tyre pressures as you do with modern bikes. This is because the weight of the passenger and/or luggage is not directly transferred to the rear suspension or rear wheel. A fully sprung Vincent (Series D) is a different matter. Start with 30 front and 32 rear and adjust from there. A good test is to inflate tyres, go for a decent ride and immediately check pressures when parked. If the pressures have increased by more than 10% then the original pressures are wrong.
On air hooks?
Alyn?
 

oexing

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Air hooks made by Siemens - an old joke here about that giant company.
"If Siemens knew what Siemens knows - they´d be unbeatable ! "

Vic
 

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