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The most original Lightning on the planet?


davidd

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Very strange: Rims seem to have differing diameter on the foto?!
Well, the smaller wheel on the right says "3.50 X 20", so I suspect that they are the same size. The low shoulder alloy rim on the left tends to look bigger because the shoulder is smaller than that of the Borrani rim. Both were supplied as stock rims on Lightnings and Grey Flashes. Sometimes one of each like the Burns & Wright bike. Brand names of rims were usually not indicated on the work orders even if the Avon brand racing tires were often specified.

David
 

Cyborg

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Looks like an alloy FT5 without the bit sticking up for the FT132 etc.
Also FT23/2 in alloy? Surprised to see them on there regardless of what they are made of? Speaking of what they are made of... I'll wager its not 7075. Anyone know what alloy they used for the G50?
 
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Little Honda

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Am I right, when I see a steel rim at the rear wheel and a flanged alloy rim at the front? Both have tyre bolts
fitted with balance weights fixed by tape. Did they use these very low tyre pressures from the road bike
manuals also for record attempts at Montlhery? Also interesting: The rear sprocket looks smaller in dia. than
the brake drum. So only one rear drum fitted.
 

Canadiancomet

Active Website User
VOC Member
Looks like an alloy FT5 without the bit sticking up for the FT132 etc.
Also FT23/2 in alloy? Surprised to see them on there regardless of what they are made of? Speaking of what they are made of... I'll wager its not 7075. Anyone know what alloy they used for the G50?
CYBORG Are Ken C? If so I hear you may travel to Manitoba this summer. If so I hope the Golden Boys can buy you lunch and have a visit. Sorry to hijack the thread. I will add that I know the Len hardy Vincent Lightning well and we will in the future tell it's story when Barry S and I sit down for a chin wag..
 

davidd

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
The Burns & Wright bike has two aluminum rims. Most Lightnings did, although the rims could be of two different makes. The Factory did supply high tensile steel rims. These were usually noted on the Works Order Form in some way and seem to be special order for sidecar work or if the purchaser felt the steel rim would be more suitable.

I don't know what tire pressures they ran for speed work. I always ran the maximum allowable pressure to keep the tires cool. Somewhere around 60 lbs. I am sure they followed the manufacturer's instructions.

The H57 sprocket adapter for replacing the brake drum was available for Lightnings. This allowed the use of smaller sprockets for very high speeds.

David
 

litnman

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Did Dunlop stamp rims used on Lightnings? I have a 20" and a 21" wheel
which is identical to wheels on another Lightning. Neither have any stamping on them.
 

davidd

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Did Dunlop stamp rims used on Lightnings? I have a 20" and a 21" wheel
which is identical to wheels on another Lightning. Neither have any stamping on them.
John Bland was the gentleman that was responsible for ordering parts from suppliers. He told me that Dunlop was extremely careful about marking their products with a brand and place of origin. Based on his recollection I always believed that if Dunlop made it, it was marked. I asked him about the unmarked low shoulder aluminum rims on Flashes and Lightnings. He could not remember the supplier, but did remember that they were in Italy. He also ordered rims from Boranni and said so. Thus, he was not confusing the rims he was ordering from Boranni with the low shoulder rims. Boranni seemed to follow the British rules on trademarks. It may have been due to their long association with Rudge wheels.
cycledaytonavincent5.jpg
This is my bike at Daytona in 1953. The low shouldered rims are front and rear. A quick look and you could mistake them for steel.

David
 

genedn

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
John Bland was the gentleman that was responsible for ordering parts from suppliers. He told me that Dunlop was extremely careful about marking their products with a brand and place of origin. Based on his recollection I always believed that if Dunlop made it, it was marked. I asked him about the unmarked low shoulder aluminum rims on Flashes and Lightnings. He could not remember the supplier, but did remember that they were in Italy. He also ordered rims from Boranni and said so. Thus, he was not confusing the rims he was ordering from Boranni with the low shoulder rims. Boranni seemed to follow the British rules on trademarks. It may have been due to their long association with Rudge wheels.
View attachment 31970
This is my bike at Daytona in 1953. The low shouldered rims are front and rear. A quick look and you could mistake them for steel.

David
As I did with litnman’s bike in the picture he provided. So maybe a third supplier that’s interesting.
 

aluminiumbronze

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
John Bland was the gentleman that was responsible for ordering parts from suppliers. He told me that Dunlop was extremely careful about marking their products with a brand and place of origin. Based on his recollection I always believed that if Dunlop made it, it was marked. I asked him about the unmarked low shoulder aluminum rims on Flashes and Lightnings. He could not remember the supplier, but did remember that they were in Italy. He also ordered rims from Boranni and said so. Thus, he was not confusing the rims he was ordering from Boranni with the low shoulder rims. Boranni seemed to follow the British rules on trademarks. It may have been due to their long association with Rudge wheels.
View attachment 31970
This is my bike at Daytona in 1953. The low shouldered rims are front and rear. A quick look and you could mistake them for steel.

David
Hi David, I have also heard the low shouldered alloy rims referred to as Pre Dunlop’s as in in Dunlop’s but not stamped, I have a set of these in the shed, I got them from Reg Hint who said they came to him on Alec Corners Rapide which he owned for many years
 

TouringComet

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
VOC Forum Administrator
This is a picture taken at the California rally in 81 ? That is Rollie Free on his personal Lightning. It was then owned by Nick Pierce. It is indeed probably the best survivor out there. Only used once.
Yes, the Bass Lake 1980 rally.

Used more than once. Rollie took his own Lightning to Bonneville multiple years.
 

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